Tag Archives: education reform

Rethinking Learning for Changing Education


Lives matter, actions matter, even words matter. What these signal are the values of humanity for treating everyone as equal; they highlight the power of coming together and the importance of communication by choosing the words we use.

So when we say we’re “learning” something, why does that matter, and what does learning really mean? 

Learning is best described as a process, which is different from a product or a collection of information. It’s this process that means we are always changing, modifying, and refining what we know, do, value, and prefer.

What’s interesting is that many of us suggest that learning occurs in designated areas such as schools, workplaces, or traditional spaces built for learning, namely universities, museums, and libraries.

But something as simple as learning (an always changing process) being housed in places that doesn’t change, makes me also wonder what we really mean, even more, what really matters, about our “education…”

 

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Emotions of Education: A Passion for Reform


Many agree that emotions can rule over all reason and sense. Emotions can also encourage and drive us to achieve enormous feats. They are a power with a wide range of potential. 

Now what if emotions were targeted toward education? I mean, what would be the emotional range that we could learn from?

I can think of three in particular: Pain, Pleasure, and Passion.  These emotions when geared toward education can reveal some surprising insights. For instance: What is it about education that brings us pain? Some are failing grades, tuition, student loans, finding the right schools, filling out entrance applications for our children or ourselves, and so on.   

What about the  pleasures of education? Some can identify with receiving great grades, degrees, diplomas, even ‘aha moments’ from learning something new or seeing someone grow in understanding and perspective.

Lastly,  there is the emotion of passion in education.  This is arguably the most misunderstood.  On one hand, we think about passion as a desire, pursuit, personal calling, or profound interest in an area or discipline.  Along these lines, experiencing passion in education would be a welcomed thing that helps define our purposes and pursuits.

On the other hand, passion relates to endurance. In fact, a Latin version of passion ties to patience and ‘suffering.’  Remember the ole saying: ‘Patience is a Virtue’? Well in this case, patience is having the passion to endure, suffer, and even overcome the circumstances.

Which leads me to a final insight for those who claim to have a passion for education: teachers, school boards, politicians, governments, and learning institutions such as schools, colleges, and universities. 

Can all of them match their desire to pursue education with the suffering and endurance that is necessary  to change it for everyone, especially for those who do not know educational reform and improvement must take place.   

My worry is that many are distracting us with superficial solutions for educational pains, promoting unearned pleasures, while ignoring the most important and emotional impact of advancing a full passion toward a lasting and lifelong education.